Adding more Beta releases to the train

In March of 2011 we shipped Firefox 4 and moved to a rapid release with 6 weeks on each of Nightly, Aurora, and Beta channels prior to shipping a new major version of Firefox Desktop and Mobile to our users. Both Nightly and Aurora channels were getting builds & updates nightly (breakage notwithstanding) while Beta builds were still a highly managed, hands-on release product that shipped once per week, giving 6 builds in all unless there were additional last-minute landings  (typically critical security or 3rd party plugin/addon issues) requiring a beta 7 or, rarely, 8 prior to building our release candidate for that version.

Go to build by or before Tuesday EOD Pacific time, builds would be pushed to beta channel as soon as QA signed off which could be Friday morning or sometimes Thursday afternoons if done early.
Go to build by or before Tuesday EOD Pacific time, builds would be pushed to beta channel as soon as QA signed off which could be Friday morning or sometimes Thursday afternoons if done early.

This is the model we followed up until Firefox 23.  Starting in Firefox 15 we had the ability to perform silent, background updating which meant that we could push more updates to releases without causing update fatigue. Release Management, Release Engineering, QA, Stability, Support hashed out what it would take to move to a system where Beta builds are done on a nightly, automated manner.  We dubbed this a Rapid Beta model and as work from all teams has been done toward that goal we have managed to get a handle on where the bottlenecks are which impeding the complete automation of pushing out the most recent Beta code to our 10 million Beta users.

The reason it is to our advantage to get more builds to Beta users is because at 1/10th of our general release population, the faster we can get fixes (especially crash fixes or speculative fixes for compatibility and addon/plugin breakage) to our users, the sooner we can collect much-needed data that can verify the quality of our impending final build.  With the previous model, fixes missing a beta train meant that much more risk was added to the landing and typically we throttled the landing of all but the most serious security and usability patches back after the 4th beta meaning sometimes developers (and release managers) would be forced to make more pressured decisions about whether something could make a release or have to wait 8 more weeks to be in the next train.

QA did work to pare down on the manual testing needed for sign-off, Release Engineering put together a fabulous Ship-It web interface that Release Management could use to request builds in a more hands-off way to make the processes around starting & monitoring a new beta build much less time intensive.  Socorro work was done to make it possible to match crash data to build IDs so that we could technically support nightly Beta builds and see stability data in useful ways. Once all this work was in place we took a leap of faith and started releasing twice as many Beta builds in weeks 2-5 of the cycle for Firefox 23.

    First and last week still have one beta, weeks 2-5 have two builds per week where one is built on Monday shipping by Wednesday and the other build starts Thursday and ships by end of day Friday.
First and last week still have one beta, weeks 2-5 have two builds per week where one is built on Monday shipping by Wednesday and the other build starts Thursday and ships by end of day Friday.

This new model has had two full releases now, Firefox 23 & 24.  The feedback so far has been quite positive.  Release Engineering has been minimally called upon when the shipping app interface hit glitches, but those are mostly ironed out now.  QA is turning around their sign off of Firefox Desktop within approximately 24 hours and according to them their bug fix verification rates are going up with this new model in part because the smaller changes per Beta allow them to focus more.  They’ve also had an intern and have had their remote testers team gain additional resources, but the switch to more frequent Betas has apparently gone quite smoothly for them.  From a Release Management perspective, the tracking & landing of fixes on Beta is going much better since we now have less panic & stress on landings at the beginning of each week.  With one Beta getting kicked off on Mondays we start the week with something to start evaluating mid-week and then we continue to pick up fixes as developers start their week in order to get another build for feedback gathered over the weekend.

We're moving away from spikes of landings near the end of the Beta cycle now that we have more Betas for people to land in.
We’re moving away from spikes of landings near the end of the Beta cycle now that we have more Betas for people to land in.

Though the data is a little rough right now (I’m dreaming of a pushlog DB), the numbers so far look like we’re doing a good job of spreading out the landings over the course of the cycle, still tapering off at the end:

Landings are more evenly spread out in a week.
Landings are more evenly spread out in a week.

While at the same time, our overall tracking average remains stable and our tracked bugs fixed rate has been holding over 90% per release for the past 3 releases:

Tracking bugs fixed over unfixed Screen Shot 2013-10-17 at 5.55.12 PMScreen Shot 2013-10-17 at 5.57.07 PM Tracked to fixed percentage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Along with these improvements to getting features, regression & crash fixes to our users sooner with more automation and hands-off processes, we’ve been getting a lot out of the fact that we now have people who are full time sheriffs of the tree.  Ryan VanderMeulen and Ed Morley are doing a lot of the heavy lifting keeping uplifts in order and landing frequently as well as monitoring the trees for breakage.  Having managed trees, as well as team trees for active development is likely responsible for our tracking+/fix ratio on mozilla-central improving over time.

Finally, what’s most important from this experiment and what we consider to be the biggest win so far is that this new beta model helps release drivers over the whole cycle make decisions about uplifts with less concern about timing, and more focus on overall risk to product. Having more Beta builds means not having to make rash decisions because of scarcity.  We will continue to collect data and monitor our progress as well as work towards automated, nightly Beta builds since that would get us crash feedback on a more granular level but for now I see this current progress as a huge step forward for the stability and quality of our releases. Neither of the last two releases had to be followed by dot releases for anything we could have prevented.  Our Beta audience size holds strong, confirming that background updates are doing their job.  Next up we’ll be looking at potentially moving to a slightly longer, and overlapping Beta cycle while shortening time on Aurora – but that’s another post for another time.

 

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